Justin Tyler Norton

Artist and Photographer

Portland, Oregon

The storm passing through my mind:

livefreeandburn:

Salvador Dali – Ménagère (Cutlery Set) 1957
Six pieces (silver-gilt) comprising of two forks, two knives and two enameled spoons.

livefreeandburn:

Salvador Dali – Ménagère (Cutlery Set) 1957

Six pieces (silver-gilt) comprising of two forks, two knives and two enameled spoons.

(Source: aarcadien)

transistoradio:

Gerhard Richter (b.1932), Abstract Painting (726) (1990), oil on canvas, 350 x 250 cm. Collection of Tate, UK. Via Tate.

transistoradio:

Gerhard Richter (b.1932), Abstract Painting (726) (1990), oil on canvas, 350 x 250 cm. Collection of Tate, UK. Via Tate.

adrieldaniel:

"We are like sculptors, constantly carving out of others the image we long for, need, love or desire."

— Anaïs Nin

(via yvetvdn)

transistoradio:

William Nicholson (1872-1949), Carlina (1909), oil on canvas, 121.9 x 157.5 cm. Via BBC.

transistoradio:

William Nicholson (1872-1949), Carlina (1909), oil on canvas, 121.9 x 157.5 cm. Via BBC.

Film Photography

One of the most challenging qualities of film photography caught my attention from the start: the darkroom. The influence of a photograph is greatly determined in this process, as subjects and ideas are better resolved. A finished photographic print tells me things that no other process does. It becomes a starting point to evaluate an idea, or to reconsider the technique applied. I believe it is a key to the nature of the art, and a means to further express personal interests.

Similar to the cycles of drawing and painting, to which the elegance of a line coupled with the strength of mass may create an overwhelming sensation. The inherent elements of the process and how they are applied radically influence the finish. The darkroom is an arena for those with an insatiable desire to better understand the process of film photography; and to continually refine applied methods with intent.

While I begin to exhibit work in galleries, further explore ideas and subjects, and implement new photographic methods, I intend to continue printing by hand to create the most resounding images possible.

J. T. NORTON

William Adolphe Bouguereau 1825-1905

I began collecting books on the work of William Bouguereau after discovering him by accident. He was a Neoclassical painter of the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris during the nineteenth century. Some of the paintings he made of nude women surrounded by little children depicted as cherubs having their way in the picture frame have caused a large portion of his work to be disregarded as novel. That is however, a limited knowledge of his greater work. There are a number of paintings that have an overwhelming sense of raw human experience. For example, Dante and Virgil in Hell, and First Mourning.

I consider the methods and process of his work comparable to many contemporary photographers like Sally Mann, or Jock Sturges. It is not uncommon to find the opinion of these photographers, including Bill Henson, to be scandalous in some way. Unusual how a medium can change the interpretation of an idea. To me, the medium is different, but the ideas have found their way through. Weaving themselves into the time.

I do not advocate for the sole imitation of former styles of expression. Music, literature, and various other forms of art in the past have found their own means, as we should now. The appreciation I have for the drawings and paintings of Bouguereau is an acknowledgement of the ideas and technical ability to produce that caliber of work. I find these works to be complete with elegance, violence, and eroticism. In every way communicating the feelings and expressions of contemporary existence.

The images listed are sourced from books in my collection. The rights to these images remain with their respective owners.


© The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the City of Paris and the Wadsworth Anthemeum of Hartford, Connecticut (1980). William Bouguereau, exhibition catalogue

The Philbrook Museum of Art (2006). In the Studios of Paris. Yale Press

Wissman, Fronia E. (1996) Bouguereau. Pomegranate Artbooks.

The value and rank of every art is in proportion to the mental labour employed in it, or the mental pleasure produced by it.

—Discourses on Art, Sir Joshua Reynolds 1771

iamawildchild:

Ms. Blanchett

Cate Blanchett photographed by Bill Henson

iamawildchild:

Ms. Blanchett

Cate Blanchett photographed by Bill Henson

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